London software testing news UK


The Microsoft Interoperability Lab

Posted in Software testing by testing in London on November 6, 2007

From eweek

Microsoft has an interoperability play around Web services, and it’s taking shape in a lab here on the software maker’s campus.

Greg Leake, Microsoft’s technical marketing manager for .Net, has set up what he calls the “.Net Framework/Application Server Lab” to test interoperability between .Net-based applications and applications written in Java and running on Linux and other platforms.

“We built the lab so we could show improved interoperability over Web services,” Leake told eWEEK during a tour of the lab.

He said the over-arching interoperability play is key to Microsoft’s newly broad-ranging service-oriented architecture strategy known as “Oslo.”

The lab consists of multiple rows of servers and older low-cost PCs used as “users” to make transactions against various applications being tested. Leake also uses automated software to simulate the impact of adding more and more users, up to 10,000, to an application’s user base. Leaks said he is using Hewlett-Packard’s Mercury LoadRunner, among other tools, to load test the applications.

The primary application run in the lab is Microsoft’s .Net StockTrader, which the software giant used to test the performance of a .Net-based application against a Java-based application from IBM.

Microsoft used .Net StockTrader to show that .Net and WFC (Windows Communication Foundation), along with Windows Server 2003, could compete against—and interoperate with—Java-based transaction processing applications, Leake said.

The benchmark compares .Net StockTrader against IBM’s Trade 6.1 performance application. Trade 6.1 is a J2EE (Java 2 Platform, Enterprise Edition)-based application IBM uses as a best-practice performance sample application and capacity testing tool for IBM WebSphere 6.1.

Web application testing 

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